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Oscars 2021: Attendees will not wear face masks during telecast


The Academy is not asking Oscar attendees to wear face masks while cameras are rolling during the live ceremony on April 25.

The news was announced on Monday morning during a Zoom meeting with Academy reps and nominees, and studio and personal publicists. Because the ceremony — being held at Union Station in downtown Los Angeles — is being treated as a TV/film production, masks are not required for people on camera, an Academy staffer explained.

However, when guests are not on camera, they are being asked to wear masks. For example, masks should be put on during commercial breaks.

Leonardo DiCaprio, Brie Larson, Brad Pitt, Kathy Bates and Mahershala Ali sit in the audience during the 92nd Annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre on February 09, 2020 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Richard Harbaugh – Handout/A.M.P.A.S. via Getty Images) (A.M.P.A.S. via Getty Images)

The Academy also revealed that audience capacity will be limited to 170 people. As Variety first reported earlier this month, audience members will be rotated in and out of the ceremony. Upon arrival to Union Station, nominees will receive a personalised itinerary that outlines what times they will be rotated in and out.

RELATED: Oscars 2021: Where to watch the Best Picture nominees

Oscars co-producer Steven Soderbergh remained mum on face-mask protocol during a press conference with co-producers Jesse Collins and Stacey Sher. He said on Saturday that masks would play “a very important role in the story”.

“If that’s cryptic, it’s meant to be,” he added. “That topic is very central to the narrative.”

Actor Sam Rockwell in the audience during the 90th Annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center on March 4, 2018 in Hollywood, California (Getty)

The meeting included a detailed walk-through of what attendees should expect at Union Station. A temperature check will be mandatory. Attendees must also take at least three COVID tests in the days leading up to the ceremony.

An abbreviated red carpet will include three photographers and a limited number of press outlets doing interviews, including ABC News, KABC and E! International outlets will be from Japan, Canada, the UK, Germany, France, Brazil, Spain, Mexico and Australia. There will be at least seven feet between reporters and interviewees.

In addition to virtual press-conference style interviews backstage, winners will have the opportunity to do virtual interviews with Kelly Ripa and Ryan Seacrest for Live With Kelly and Ryan as well as Lara Spencer of Good Morning America.

<B>The Oscar:</B> Best Actress for <I>Erin Brockovich</I>, at the 73rd Academy Awards (2001).<br/><br/><B>The speech:</B> Roberts' five-minute speech was the second longest in Oscar history, allowing her to thank her co-stars, agent and producers - but not Brockovich herself, whose story was the reason Julia won the award in the first place. Burned. Watch her horse laugh on the next slide.<br/><B>Worst bit:</B> <I>[To her shiny new Oscar statue]</I> "I can't believe this - this is quite pretty."

Best and worst Oscar speeches



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